Collecting Social Data

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Social data comes from various outlets.  It’s not just your online presence; it is in-person meetings, networking events, phone calls and even gossip. You capture all of these points in your database, building detailed profiles. With all of these social data points in your database, it can be hard to know what to do with them.  However, nonprofits have a major opportunity to use social data to asses a prospect’s life and passions. 

Your development team should use this information with the aim of connecting your organization’s work to what a donor cares about – if you reach out with a pertinent campaign, a prospect is much more likely to give when they are personally and passionately aligned with your mission.

Timing is everything

Without social data, knowing when the right time to reach out is can be a challenge. Social data provides cues, allowing you to make a more informed decision on when it’s the right time to reach out.

Through your social connections, you can have an inside track on a donor or prospect’s life: job changes, births, graduations and more. These are great times to reach out and make a personal connection with your donors. On the other hand, social data can let you know when it’s not the right time to reach out, helping you avoid any uncomfortable situations that could dissuade a prospect. Overall, social data delivers excellent background information to build a connection into a relationship.

Be social with your social data

Your development team won’t be the only ones to benefit from social data. The web team, social media team, management, human resources, etc. can all use social data to be more successful. Aside from identifying donors passionate about your mission, your whole organization can use this data to not only improve their work, but to foster a culture of philanthropy. If your nonprofit is hosting a large gala event, wouldn’t it be nice to arm your executives with pertinent data about the key attendees? This ensures they effectively use their time for cultivating these relationships. Once the event wraps, be sure to debrief with the executives. It’s an opportunity to gather more social data to add to your database. When your whole team works together on your social data, it’s a win for your organization!

Social data can be key in targeting specific segments of your database. Register for our webinar Leveraging Social Media & Events to Engage Millennials to learn how to better engage millennials through social media and events. 

3 Keys for Creating a Sustainable Fundraising Program: Your Most Valuable Asset

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WealthEngine works with nonprofits across the spectrum, from the largest universities, hospitals, and international aid organizations to local and regional arts and social service agencies.  Many of those who reach out to us are startups who have a passion, a vision and willing hands, but lack fundraising expertise and have few or no resources to hire trained staff members. In this three part blog series we offer three keys to help make your fundraising program more sustainable.

Welcome to the second of our 3-part series on creating a sustainable fundraising program. In last week’s blog post, Who’s on Board? we addressed the impact board members can have on fundraising.  While addressing board expansion is critical to future success, there are other considerations of nonprofit governance and fundraising for a young board to consider when developing plans to expand or develop a sustainable organization.  This post will focus on one of the most important considerations, which also happens to be your most valuable asset – your fundraising list.

Some organizations have a natural constituency ideal for fundraising.  Colleges and universities have alumni, theaters have ticket buyers, and hospitals have patients.  However, many nonprofits fill niches in our social fabric that serve many that don’t have a large, affluent natural constituency.  For these organizations, the need to build a strong house list for fundraising purposes is critical.  Without a list of donors and a consistent inflow of unrestricted dollars, they will not be able to achieve a sustainable source of monthly giving.  

In today’s digital world, there are two important channels in which to grow your list:

Website:  Your website is the hub of all your activity. The majority of your outreach will drive individuals to visit your website. Therefore, it must have the ability to capture attention, make a good impression, and most importantly, capture information from your visitors so you can communicate with them in some way.

Some ideas for website optimization could include:

  • Add a ‘Donate’ or button to each page and make sure it’s easily found to increase list signup and donations.
  • Capture email signups on each page of your site; add an offer to each of these links to increase the likelihood that people convert.
  • Create premium gated content, such as a white paper or e-book, on your site that gives more information about your cause, clients, or success stories. Collect email addresses to allow users to download.

Do you notice a theme here? You are including calls to action throughout your website to make it easy to capture information. Don’t make your visitors search around on your website to donate or subscribe to your content. Your website should be easy to navigate so visitors can find what they are looking for in as few clicks as possible. After all, you’re looking to gain advocates – not lose them!

Social Media:  Using social channels is a great way to build community. Some options include Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and many more. While the channels may differ, your strategy should be similar. The posts and content that you share should invite dialogue and feedback. Including calls to action in your posts to drive people to your website to capture names and addresses will be a good way to potentially increase your list. 

Examples posts could include: 

  • Do you think it’s harder to be a teen today than in the past? Why or why not?  Do you have a story to share?  How did you find your way out of a difficult situation?
  • Have you or a friend or loved one been in need of family services only to be told “there’s a two week waiting list,” or “We don’t have room?”.  What services do you think our area is lacking?  How would you address those needs if you could?
  • Did you know: One in ten teens in our area lives in fear of abuse from a parent or guardian? Find out more (link to your website)
  • We’re filling a gap in mental health services in our community.  If you believe that every teen deserves the chance to find peace and faith in a safe, secure and professionally run home, join our mailing list to receive updates and opportunities to become involved.
  • How does a house become a home? LOVE.  Follow along as we transform House of Hope into a home for troubled teens.  Visit our website for photos and progress updates!

Use images wisely throughout your social posts. While text contains the content that your visitors will engage with, pictures help draw them in and get your initial clicks.

Web and Social tactics aren’t the only ways to build a list. There are some other things you can do to increase the size of your audience: 

  • Your board members can contribute. They may include some of their personal contacts, but the purpose is to build your major program/prospect list. 
  • Events can be an excellent way to get attention for your mission and cause. They can also work to grow your list and bring in substantial funds as well. At your events, think of mechanisms that will allow you to collect the names and addresses (email or physical) such as ticket purchases or sign-ups for a giveaway/raffle.  
  • Partnerships with organizations that have complementary missions, civic groups, or corporate sponsors can help provide additional names to your list. In addition, you could also obtain budgetary support, speaking opportunities to share your story directly with their members of employees, volunteers, or advocates for the mission within the larger community.
  • WealthEngine has a unique prospecting tool called WE Prospect. You can build a custom audience with criteria such as geography, net worth, charitable interests, and more. Check out this exceptional list-building tool.

Finally, you should define what you think your “perfect” supporter looks like.  Are there different types? Can you develop several personas to help describe the audience you want to reach?  This could help as you write fundraising letters or newsletter articles, and also as you develop ideas for special events, advertising, and other list-building activities. Discover how to create personas in five simple steps. 

Building a solid list of supporters and potential supporters is essential for any nonprofit.  In fact, many would argue that your list is your most valuable asset. But building a list without having a plan in place to communicate with your new friends, steward them, and involve and educate them is a wasted effort.  

Do you have a story to share about how you’ve grown your list? Share in the comments below.

Tune in next week for the final post in our series, Planning to Excel. We will share the tools you need to develop a solid donor communications plan.

 

 

 

 

Where Wealth Intelligence Meets Social Insights

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This is a collaborative post written by Jessica Smith at WealthEngine and Jeanette Russell at Attentive.ly.


When you think about your top donors, do you have really clear snapshot of what they look like from both a wealth and social perspective?

In other words, you should not only have social insights on your prospects and donors are, but have a solid understanding of their wealth and their propensity to give.

If you don’t, there’s no need to fear. WealthEngine and Attentive.ly are joining forces to bring you some actionable strategies to level up your game and find the perfect prospect.

Continue reading “Where Wealth Intelligence Meets Social Insights”

Mike Lees’ Week in Review: On LinkedIn about Data Being Everywhere and Datasexuals?

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Are you sick of hearing the words “Big Data” yet? While “Big Data” has quite a history, it’s relatively new to those on marketing teams. And while it might sound repetitive, there’s a reason it’s what CMOs are talking about. Big data is at the core of what we do here at WealthEngine. Last week, I tweeted my first published post on LinkedIn on why Big Data is more than just a buzzword. I hope you’ll read what I had to say and comment.

Also, another word I’m still on the fence about whether or not we’ll hear it a lot is the term datasexual. It’s a provocative term to say the least and I’m sure that Michael Kaushansky meant to be provocative when he wrote “Data Saves the CMO” for MediaPost recently. However, I think those of us that eat, breathe and live data in our daily lives as marketing practitioners probably don’t want to include that in our LinkedIn profiles or resumes. Or do we?

Have ideas for alternative terms to “datasexual” to describe those who use data to drive marketing business decisions? Tweet them to me at @MichaelJLees.

In case you missed it last week, we’re hosting our  #WECMO Series events in San Francisco next week and New York City the following week. Bryan Kramer, CEO at PureMatter and author of the book “Shareology”, and I will be talking about marketing personalization at scale in San Francisco on July 15. Those attending the event will receive a free copy of his book, being released on July 14! On July 21,  Bill Evans, Chief Digital Officer at WPP, will join me in a follow-up from our webinar last week and we’ll be talking about data, digital, wealth and predictive prospecting. If you are a marketing leader, make sure you RSVP to our NY WE CMO Series event and our SF WE CMO Series event as soon as possible as space is limited.

Would love if you would join the conversation

Michael Lees is Chief Marketing Officer at WealthEngine. His “Week in Review” is a weekly round-up of conversations, insights and inspiration he’s discovered around the web. Have something you want him to take a look at and weigh in on? Tweet him @michaeljlees and tag #WECMO.

Want a demo of WealthEngine to see how WE can help you with audience development, marketing personalization and wealth insights? Share your contact information and we’ll be in touch soon.

Mike Lees’ Week in Review: CEOs Taking Marketing Seriously, Data-Driven Marketing for Small Business, Personalized Marketing and More

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Marketing is critical to the success of a company, right? You would think that this was a commonly held belief but the true test is if the CEO sees marketing as a high priority. Forbes talks about this in their coverage of the CMO Impact Study I tweeted last week.

Many small business embrace analytics to a degree through their website metrics and their email marketing dashboard and in many cases this is where their data-driven marketing begins and ends because many believe that anything more is for the enterprise. Not so fast. I tweeted a great piece from Business2Community that talks about how small businesses can segment and target their customers and prospects more effectively by tying all of their data points together.

When we think about taking a personalized approach to marketing, it’s important that you have enough insights in order to really be effective, in the CMO.com article I tweeted it talks about how 70% of buyers journeys are already completed before any human contact is made. That’s why personalized marketing is so important. Speaking of Human to Human marketing (H2H), I have also been talking to Bryan Kramer, Author of Shareology and CEO at PureMatter, about the fine line between personalization, privacy and the potential creepiness factor. If you’re not already a part of his #H2HChat on Twitter every week on Mondays, you should consider joining in.

Would love if you would join the conversation.

Michael Lees is Chief Marketing Officer at WealthEngine. His “Week in Review” is a weekly round-up of conversations, insights and inspiration he’s discovered around the web. Have something you want him to take a look at and weigh in on? Tweet him @michaeljlees and tag #WECMO.

Want a demo of WealthEngine to see how WE can help you with audience development, marketing personalization and wealth insights? Share your contact information and we’ll be in touch soon.

Mike Lees’ Week in Review: Being a CMO, Big Data in Retail, Marketing Analytics and More

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Being a CMO means traveling. A lot. Being a 2-continent dad, also means traveling.  A lot. (It also means I write and tweet less!!). Last week was one of those weeks….starting in the UK and then taking me on to the JCK Conference in Las Vegas on Wednesday, where I hosted a panel “Changing the Game: Big Data in Retail”.  The panel’s message was clear….big data’s biggest impact in retail for the foreseeable future will be to support better prediction around which prospects and customers are buyers and which are not!  

In between traveling across several time zones, I read about why marketing analytics projects end up failing. I loved it because it played so well to the messages we heard from the customers on our panel.  They succeeded in their projects around predictive prospecting because:

  • They were focused (they were clear that they wanted the data to identify the characteristics of their best customers).
  • Their outputs were simple and consumable ( insights need to drive decisions, not more data and too much analysis). 

Why have your projects succeeded? Won’t you join the conversation?

Michael Lees is Chief Marketing Officer at WealthEngine. His “Week in Review” is a weekly round-up of conversations, insights and inspiration he’s discovered around the web. Have something you want him to take a look at and weigh in on? Tweet him @michaeljlees and tag #WECMO.

Want a demo of WealthEngine to see how WE can help you with audience development, marketing personalization and wealth insights? Share your contact information and we’ll be in touch soon.

Mike Lees’ Week in Review: Luxury Marketing, Social Media, Personalization & More

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Were you able to attend the WealthEngine Luxury Marketing webinar last week? We had thought leaders in the affluence and luxury space sharing best practices around reaching the re-emerging affluent consumer.

In addition to sharing tweets around luxury marketing, there was also some great dialogue around personalizing messages to reach consumers more effectively and how nurturing our relationships with our customers can have a positive impact on our bottom line.

Won’t you join the conversation?

Michael Lees is Chief Marketing Officer at WealthEngine. His “Week in Review” is a weekly round-up of conversations, insights and inspiration he’s discovered around the web. Have something you want him to take a look at and weigh in on? Tweet him @michaeljlees and tag #WECMO.

Want a demo of WealthEngine to see how WE can help you with audience development, marketing personalization and wealth insights? Share your contact information and we’ll be in touch soon.

Marketing Gets Real (-Time)

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We’re very excited about this one!  This week we announced our acquisition of BrightContext, a company that for the last few years has led the market in helping business people make sense of large volumes of real-time data. Big Data is by no means a new phenomena, but recently it has hit something of a “trough of disillusionment” as companies that were excited by the promise it held, face the realities of garnering real insight and presenting that insight to their employees in ways that make a difference.  And that is why the combination if WealthEngine and BrightContext is so interesting.

Continue reading “Marketing Gets Real (-Time)”