Five Ways to Use Data and Analytics to Increase Your Relevancy and Add Value to Your Fundraising

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With the explosion of using data and analytics in nonprofit environments, it’s no surprise that more effective methods of identifying and segmenting donors and prospects are emerging.  With the use of analytics and the appropriate sourcing of relevant and accurate data, nonprofits can know more than ever before about their donors and other constituents, and can more accurately target passionate supporters for acquisition.

Here are five ways your organization can benefit from the explosion of big data and analytics:

  1. Statistical Profiling
    Cluster analysis or statistical profiling, combined with data appends or screening services, allow nonprofits to develop accurate profiles of their best donors, and determine what characteristics they share. Understand detailed information, such as affluence, real estate profiles, age ranges, and more. Knowing these essential characteristics of your best donors allows you to message them in a more personal and targeted way, developing deeper and more meaningful relationships, and enhancing donor loyalty among this important group.
     
  2. Finding Look-Alikes
    Knowing the profile of your best donors does not end with enhancing your relationship with them. It can also help you to identify additional supporters, who look very much like your best supporters, but haven’t yet donated to your cause. These may be mined directly out of the depths of your database. Identify the specific profiles of these individuals and find who else in your database that matches that profile. By identifying this group of under-givers and/or never-givers, you can share specific messages that have resonated solidly with your best donors, and have the confidence that they will respond likewise.
     
  3. Attribute Appends
    Lifestyle attributes can further enhance your understanding of your constituency. If you haven’t yet discovered the power of appending interests in such categories as politics, the environment, pets, the arts or healthcare, you may be missing an excellent opportunity. Data providers are now able to append donor and prospect files with literally thousands of lifestyle attributes to enable you to segment your prospects by their interests, and message them in unique ways to stir their emotions.
     
  4. Prospect List Development
    If your nonprofit, like so many, needs to find new prospects, your data profile and lifestyle attributes can help. It is now possible to develop very targeted and specific prospect lists that match the characteristics of your current donors. Do you need to find prospects in the Los Angeles area who are environmentally aware, have pets and are avid cyclists? Perhaps you need to find those who are politically conservative, live in the Midwest and own multiple properties? Whatever your needs, consider the many and varied sources of data that can help you build a unique prospecting list that will match your needs exactly.
     
  5. Gift Analysis
    Now that you have the data you need to understand the passions and interests of your donors, make sure you are targeting them for an appropriate “ask.” The days of asking each prospect for the same “average” gift amount are over. Analytics allows you to quickly analyze the average gift size for those in each net worth or giving capacity strata, and target your new prospects to give at the rate at which their peers or look-a-likes are contributing. You will see your average gift amount soar.

With the prevalence and availability of data of all kinds, and the accessibility of analytics, whether done in-house or outsourced, there are no more excuses for a one-size fits all solicitation strategy.  Data can help you become more relevant, more authentic, more personal, and more successful.

Are you using data and analytics in your fundraising? Share your experiences in the comments below.

The Art of Fundraising – 5 Best Fundraising Practices for an Arts & Culture Organization

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Donations are the livelihood of your organization.  And fundraising can be challenging.  It’s both an art and a science.  In order to unlock the best practices out there, you need to find out what is making fundraising and research campaigns successful and, frankly, what’s not.  Here are five best practices for successful fundraising:

  1.  Capture Ticketing Data to Identify Donor Potential
    Arts and Culture organizations have a unique pool of individuals – their ticket purchasers – who already demonstrate a genuine interest in the mission and work of their organization. These ticket buyers already contribute to your organization’s revenue stream and represent a natural prospect pool. Once these individuals have purchased tickets and walked through your doors, you are presented with a far greater advantage—they are engaged and interested in the offerings of your organization. Now they must be cultivated while their interest level is high.  ​High performing organizations usually have a strategy to harness the information collected during ticketing. Information can be captured through online ticket purchases, surveys, and visitor kiosks placed at entrances.
     
  2. Leverage Membership to Fuel Your Donor Pipeline
    Your donors like to feel involved with your organization.  The benefits of membership are to regularly engage people in the mission of your organization and then to encourage them to support it financially.  By paying quality attention to this membership group, your organization can get a lively pipeline of  donors ready to be nurtured and promoted to the next donation tier. Benefits could include: discounts, valet parking, special events, backstage tours, post-performance receptions, event privileges, gift store discounts, educational seminars, magazine subscriptions, and free admission. 
     
  3. Leverage Your Board to Build an Inner Circle
    While some organizations see active fundraising participation from their board and volunteers, others wish theirs were more active and involved.  The model board candidate has a circle of friends that show a similar giving capacity and inclination toward the Arts.  You want your board members to reach out to these friends and help the development team cultivate with a personal touch, ultimately strengthening your organization’s major gift pipeline.
     
  4. Invest in Screening
    Upgrading current donors and identifying new prospects are challenges for arts organizations.  Invest in a screening of your donors and prospects to determine who has the capacity, propensity, and affinity to donate to your organization.  Screening can help you fill in the gaps and deepen your data records so you can better segment and prioritize. 
     
  5. Manage Your Data Proactively
    The recording and updating of donor records is a must in successful fundraising.  Properly run Donor Management Systems (DMS) secure accurate and easy to follow-up results from research and wealth screenings. A well-managed DMS and solid implementation plan is indispensable. One of the most significant ways to increase the value of the data from your wealth screening is to integrate the results into your DMS. The DMS allows your team to compile information on all donors including their contact information, giving history, special event attendance, ticketing history and other interactions with the organization.

Fundraising as an arts organization poses its own set of challenges. Don’t let these challenges derail your fundraising. Use these tips to set your organization up for success.  

Do you have a story to share about successful fundraising in your arts organization? Share in the comments below.

 

Setting the Stage for Success in Your Data-Driven Major Gift Campaigns

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I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen a nonprofit plunge head-first into a capital campaign.  

Here’s the scenario: A capital campaign gets fast tracked to start. Great, right? Well, no feasibility study has been performed. An astronomically high goal is set, because, hey, why not? This is a great organization, right? The board of directors is totally gung-ho, but they’re hand’s off. The CEO thinks it’s a great idea, but is also hand’s off. Everybody is on board except …

You guessed it. The Development Team.  

Have you ever felt as if you were thrown under the bus? Yeah, that’s the feeling a development team gets when management tells them to go out and work miracles based on what? Hubris? Desire? An “edifice complex”? 

These are absolutely the wrong reasons to start a major fundraising effort like a capital campaign.  

As a fundraising professional, wouldn’t you like to speak truth to power? Wouldn’t you like to nip this kind of magical thinking in the bud? Most of all, wouldn’t you like to know that you and your colleagues won’t bear the brunt of this kind of magical thinking?

One thing that senior management does tend to listen to is data. Sure, statistics can be manipulated by spinmeisters, but data is pretty black and white. That’s why it behooves any non-profit considering a capital or other major gift campaign to take a data-driven approach.

It takes some work, but you can do an internal audit to assess your organization’s readiness for the heavy lifting ahead.

Learn about this and much, much more, in part 1 of our Data-Driven Major Gifts Campaign workbook. Download Part 1. To accompany the workbook will be a three-part webinar series, the first scheduled for August 25, 2016 with Catherine McGrath, principal with Marts & Lundy, along with Linda Garrison, WealthEngine senior consultant. Register for the webinar. 

Want to start a discussion now? Contact us or leave a message in the comments below. 

 

3 Keys for Creating a Sustainable Fundraising Program: Your Most Valuable Asset

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WealthEngine works with nonprofits across the spectrum, from the largest universities, hospitals, and international aid organizations to local and regional arts and social service agencies.  Many of those who reach out to us are startups who have a passion, a vision and willing hands, but lack fundraising expertise and have few or no resources to hire trained staff members. In this three part blog series we offer three keys to help make your fundraising program more sustainable.

Welcome to the second of our 3-part series on creating a sustainable fundraising program. In last week’s blog post, Who’s on Board? we addressed the impact board members can have on fundraising.  While addressing board expansion is critical to future success, there are other considerations of nonprofit governance and fundraising for a young board to consider when developing plans to expand or develop a sustainable organization.  This post will focus on one of the most important considerations, which also happens to be your most valuable asset – your fundraising list.

Some organizations have a natural constituency ideal for fundraising.  Colleges and universities have alumni, theaters have ticket buyers, and hospitals have patients.  However, many nonprofits fill niches in our social fabric that serve many that don’t have a large, affluent natural constituency.  For these organizations, the need to build a strong house list for fundraising purposes is critical.  Without a list of donors and a consistent inflow of unrestricted dollars, they will not be able to achieve a sustainable source of monthly giving.  

In today’s digital world, there are two important channels in which to grow your list:

Website:  Your website is the hub of all your activity. The majority of your outreach will drive individuals to visit your website. Therefore, it must have the ability to capture attention, make a good impression, and most importantly, capture information from your visitors so you can communicate with them in some way.

Some ideas for website optimization could include:

  • Add a ‘Donate’ or button to each page and make sure it’s easily found to increase list signup and donations.
  • Capture email signups on each page of your site; add an offer to each of these links to increase the likelihood that people convert.
  • Create premium gated content, such as a white paper or e-book, on your site that gives more information about your cause, clients, or success stories. Collect email addresses to allow users to download.

Do you notice a theme here? You are including calls to action throughout your website to make it easy to capture information. Don’t make your visitors search around on your website to donate or subscribe to your content. Your website should be easy to navigate so visitors can find what they are looking for in as few clicks as possible. After all, you’re looking to gain advocates – not lose them!

Social Media:  Using social channels is a great way to build community. Some options include Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and many more. While the channels may differ, your strategy should be similar. The posts and content that you share should invite dialogue and feedback. Including calls to action in your posts to drive people to your website to capture names and addresses will be a good way to potentially increase your list. 

Examples posts could include: 

  • Do you think it’s harder to be a teen today than in the past? Why or why not?  Do you have a story to share?  How did you find your way out of a difficult situation?
  • Have you or a friend or loved one been in need of family services only to be told “there’s a two week waiting list,” or “We don’t have room?”.  What services do you think our area is lacking?  How would you address those needs if you could?
  • Did you know: One in ten teens in our area lives in fear of abuse from a parent or guardian? Find out more (link to your website)
  • We’re filling a gap in mental health services in our community.  If you believe that every teen deserves the chance to find peace and faith in a safe, secure and professionally run home, join our mailing list to receive updates and opportunities to become involved.
  • How does a house become a home? LOVE.  Follow along as we transform House of Hope into a home for troubled teens.  Visit our website for photos and progress updates!

Use images wisely throughout your social posts. While text contains the content that your visitors will engage with, pictures help draw them in and get your initial clicks.

Web and Social tactics aren’t the only ways to build a list. There are some other things you can do to increase the size of your audience: 

  • Your board members can contribute. They may include some of their personal contacts, but the purpose is to build your major program/prospect list. 
  • Events can be an excellent way to get attention for your mission and cause. They can also work to grow your list and bring in substantial funds as well. At your events, think of mechanisms that will allow you to collect the names and addresses (email or physical) such as ticket purchases or sign-ups for a giveaway/raffle.  
  • Partnerships with organizations that have complementary missions, civic groups, or corporate sponsors can help provide additional names to your list. In addition, you could also obtain budgetary support, speaking opportunities to share your story directly with their members of employees, volunteers, or advocates for the mission within the larger community.
  • WealthEngine has a unique prospecting tool called WE Prospect. You can build a custom audience with criteria such as geography, net worth, charitable interests, and more. Check out this exceptional list-building tool.

Finally, you should define what you think your “perfect” supporter looks like.  Are there different types? Can you develop several personas to help describe the audience you want to reach?  This could help as you write fundraising letters or newsletter articles, and also as you develop ideas for special events, advertising, and other list-building activities. Discover how to create personas in five simple steps. 

Building a solid list of supporters and potential supporters is essential for any nonprofit.  In fact, many would argue that your list is your most valuable asset. But building a list without having a plan in place to communicate with your new friends, steward them, and involve and educate them is a wasted effort.  

Do you have a story to share about how you’ve grown your list? Share in the comments below.

Tune in next week for the final post in our series, Planning to Excel. We will share the tools you need to develop a solid donor communications plan.

 

 

 

 

3 Keys for Creating a Sustainable Fundraising Program: Who’s On Board?

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WealthEngine works with nonprofits across the spectrum, from the largest universities, hospitals, and international aid organizations to local and regional arts and social service agencies.  Many of those who reach out to us are startups who have a passion, a vision and willing hands, but lack fundraising expertise and have few or no resources to hire trained staff members. In this three part blog series we offer three keys to help make your fundraising program more sustainable. 

All organizations go through transitions in the makeup and focus of their governing boards.  Often, a mission begins with those in the community who catch the vision and passion for the mission directly from the founder or founding members.  The primary goals of these individuals are to lay the groundwork for the organization, obtain nonprofit legal status, and guide the organization through early obstacles and challenges.  These individuals often fund early activities personally.  A small group of like-minded individuals often works well in making early decisions with the agility necessary to establish the organization.

As the organization becomes more established, it is normal to look to expand the board, paying particular attention to fulfilling or anticipating certain needs.  These needs often include fundraising, influence in the community (especially if there will be zoning, legal or other hurdles), and partnerships (such as with government, civic, faith-based or social service agencies).

The board sets the fundraising tone for the organization and any donors to the cause, including individuals, foundations, and corporations. For example, when applying for grants, you will almost certainly be asked what percentage of your board members are donating (it should be 100%) and what percentage of total funds raised are from the board (it should be substantial – e.g. 20%).  Likewise, board members cannot with credibility solicit other individuals for the cause without being able to honestly say, “I believe in this and have contributed to it substantially myself (or sacrificially).”

When searching for new board members, it is important to search for particular qualities. Here are some considerations for expanding the board:

  • Affluence – While this may seem obvious, it is truly important to have a board with deep pockets.  Fundraising is one of the most important responsibilities of the board, and you will not have access or credibility to ask community members for substantial gifts without having a board who has committed these types of gifts themselves.  
  • Influence – You will want a board who has many community connections, such as those involved in the Chamber of Commerce, on the City Council, or prominent business people.  These connections are the key to expanded fundraising, committees, campaign volunteers and a pipeline for new board members.
  • Specific Expertise — You may benefit by having individuals who work in the social services sector, those with expertise in arts and culture or faith-related issues, someone in the construction field, a financial planner, or any number of other vocations.  Consider the types of expertise that are a fit for your specific needs over the coming 3-5 years, and recruit board members with these skills and abilities.

If you do have your board put together, there are two activities I recommend every board engage in if they haven’t already:

  • Have a working session to develop a case for support.  This is a comprehensive document that lays out your mission, vision, plans from getting from where you are to where you want to be, and all the reasons someone from the community might want to support you. See our Case for Support Checklist. This is not unlike a brochure that may describe your services and mission, but is more expansive, and intended as a working document to provide full and transparent visibility into your leadership, accomplishments, dreams, and needs.  It is often used as a recruitment tool for new board members and a cultivation tool for prospective major donors.
  • Develop and adopt Board Member Guidelines.  These should cover term limits (if any), roles and responsibilities (such as contributing time, treasure, talent), and governing responsibilities.  Read our sample Board Member Expectation Statement to learn more about guidelines that you could adapt for your organization.

Both of these exercises will serve you well in educating your current board and developing the tools you need to begin recruiting additional board members.  Growing your board and leveraging their skills and connections will contribute to your ability to raise major and capital gifts.  

Do you have a story to share about establishing a board to help drive fundraising activities? Share in the comments below.

Next week, we will share Part 2 of our three part series, Your Most Valuable Asset, which will cover some of the ways you can grow your fundraising list.

 

 

 

Grateful Patrons…Special Intelligence

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I just came out of watching the latest (and maybe, just maybe the best?) Bond movie – Spectre.  Now I have to admit, I am British, I love cars, I love watches and I love Bond, so I am somewhat of a sitting duck for both the movie producers and gratuitous product placements that seem to be everywhere in Bond movies.   Walking out of the theatre, I was on a high; I felt like James Bond’s less fashionable sibling who wanted everything his brother had!  If someone had presented me with the opportunity right then and there, I would have purchased that new Aston Martin DB10, that new Omega watch, or that oh-so-well-fitting Tom Ford suit!  

Unfortunately, I won’t be buying any of those thing right now (Bond accessories are a little out of my league) but you get the gist. Marketers dream of people like me who are caught up in the moment and will do just about anything to get what they see in front of them.  By next week, the euphoria will have worn off….I’ll be Mike Lees again (not the Bond Brother)…and I’ll have seen other cars, other suits and other tempting targets for my hard-earned cash. The moment will have passed.

So what’s the lesson here?  In sales, marketing and fundraising, timing is everything; it’s sales and marketing 101. This basic principle works in grateful patron programs as well. There are three basic pillars for qualifying a good sales or fundraising opportunity:

  1. do they have the budget?
  2. do they have the affinity or the need? And,
  3. is now a good time to ask?

Let’s look in a little more detail at these three in reverse order:

  • Timing – Place a message when your audience is most susceptible.  It’s not only product placement marketers that have been doing this successfully; healthcare fundraisers have been using this tactic with great success through Grateful Patient Programs (GPPs).  They know that frequent screening of patient records and frequent outreach to ‘grateful patients’ can yield great fundraising results.  For many years now, hospitals have been able to do more research, make necessary capital purchases and fund significant initiatives through these programs.  The same holds true for Grateful Patron Programs. You need to ask yourself…
    • How often are you screening your patrons?  Do you reach out to them when they are most ‘grateful’ (i.e. after a performance) or do you wait until later, maybe even until the end of the season?
  • Affinity – This one is easy.  Your patrons clearly have affinity to your cause….after all, they just came to watch your show, or visit your establishment; and many of them do so frequently.   But have you looked beyond this?  
    • Do you have the data and insight into their lifestyle and interests to determine what else interests them, what else may better align them with your cause?  Are there partnerships you could exploit to attract them?  For example, if you have a significant number of fashion lovers in your patron base, could you partner with a luxury brand to deliver a special event?  Consumer analytics vendors like WealthEngine can help here.
  • Resources – This one is a little harder.  You may know your most prominent patrons well.  But do you know the rest?  Do you truly know their capacity to give?  Do you have the insight to be able to make the right ask?
    • Wealth intelligence when done right can score your entire patron base and prioritize each and every one so that you focus your resources in the right place and optimize your fundraising with the right ask.  This is where tools like WealthEngine can truly make a difference.

All of this can seem a little daunting, but it really isn’t.  With some simple changes to your fundraising practices and the introduction of the right data, you can develop processes to consistently make the right ask of the right people at the right time.  

Many of your peers are already doing this (take a look here) and can attest that while you don’t need the resources and cunning of an international special agent, you do need special intelligence.   That’s where we can help.   The name’s Engine…WealthEngine.

To learn more about WealthEngine and our Grateful Patron Program offerings for Arts & Culture organizations take a look here.

From accountant and financial analyst to entrepreneur and get-to-market strategist (it’s never as easy as just going-to-market), Mike’s professional journey has armed him with a unique set of skills and perspective – starting with a product that meets unmet needs, through delivering simple and differentiated messages that generate demand, Mike has done it all.

 

Five Things You Don’t Know You Don’t Know (But Training Does!)

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As a Senior Product Specialist at WealthEngine, I spend my days training clients on how to use various products they have purchased from WealthEngine. Most people assume that I only train brand new clients, but many of my training sessions are done with clients who have been using WealthEngine products for years. Why do these clients bother taking training on how to use something that’s been a huge part of their work flow for years?

Because you don’t know what you don’t know.

Trust me, I can feel the eye rolls happening as you read that. “I see what you did there with your snazzy word choice,” you say, “but I’ve been using WealthEngine for years. I know what I’m doing.” I don’t doubt that you do, Hypothetical Mystery Client, but knowing what you’re doing and knowing the best ways to do what you’re doing are two very different things. There’s a chance that you’re making your work harder that it needs to be. Maybe you’re using a score that’s not really the best fit for what you’re looking for. Maybe you’re not aware of a feature that could be saving you a ton of time. That’s where I can come in to help save the day.

Let’s look at some common things I’ve found that even our more seasoned clients aren’t always clear on.

1. You Probably Think P2G Is About You.

Our P2G (or Propensity To Give) score is one of the most useful scores in WealthEngine profiles and can be seen in profiles pulled from a variety of our tools (like batch screenings, individual searches in FindWealth 8, or We Prospect). While it is one of the most useful scores we offer, it is arguably also the most misconstrued.

Some clients are surprised to find out that a donor’s P2G score is not related to their history with the client’s organization. Others are surprised to find that it also goes beyond the obvious factors, like someone’s publicly visible assets or political donations.

In fact, P2G looks at a wide variety of factors. Because of this, the P2G score that someone possesses tells you a great deal about the content of their profile before you ever open it up. It can help you identify hidden gems and help save you time while looking through prospects.

2. Gift Capacity Isn’t Everything.

Arguably the second most misconstrued score is Gift Capacity, which can be viewed in nonprofit profiles from WealthEngine. Having a high Gift Capacity is directly related to someone’s publicly visible assets, but does not necessarily take other factors into account. What if you have a prospect that has all of their real estate tied up under a less-than-obvious trust or LLC? Their Gift Capacity could end up being very misleading at first glance. I can show you tricks around that and what scores are going to be better indicators of that prospect’s actual priority level.

3. Profiles Aren’t Set In Stone.

Tell me if this sounds familiar: you’re looking at a profile for one of your top prospects. You’re just giving it a quick once-over before you hand it off for someone to use and then you see it. You notice that there’s something in there that shouldn’t be. You’re scared that it is throwing off the scores. You can hear it laughing evilly from within the computer.

Would you be surprised to know that you can delete data with a simple click? I can show you how to delete items from a profile and recalculate the profile with the information removed. I can even show you what is worth deleting and what doesn’t affect the profile so that you don’t waste time as you validate.

And when you’ve got that situation where you want to edit values themselves before they go into the scores, like adding a pesky piece of real estate to your nonprofit prospect’s profile? Yep, I can help with that, too.

4. Now You See It, Now You Don’t.

There are many situations where you might want to hand a nice PDF of a profile off to a colleague but you don’t want to hand them everything. Sure, the fact that the prospect has $5 million in real estate is great, but your colleague doesn’t want to read through every single real estate record.

​Did you know that you can create templates for your PDF or DOC downloads? I can keep you from manually parsing out what you do and don’t want to be visible every time. Instead, I can show you how to create reusable custom templates that only include the data you actually want them to see.

5. Transaction Histories, News Alerts, and Stocks…oh my!

​The Specialty Search options can be a bit intimidating to some clients but they can really enhance your researching experience. As a subscriber to FindWealth 8, you have access to property search tools that can show you transaction histories for properties (which can be incredibly useful if you want to see if someone has moved or transferred their home ownership). You also have access to an up-to-date news database that allows for highly specific emailed news alerts (like if you only want to be emailed once a week if a certain phrase or name appears in a newspaper obituary). You can even set up email alerts if a prospect takes part in a transaction with their insider stock.

I can show you how to take advantage of all of these features and more to make sure you are taking full advantage of your subscription.​

​So, Hypothetical Client, please be sure to schedule your training as soon as possible. Snazzy word choices aside, I sincerely want to make sure you’re getting the most out of your investment with WealthEngine. Let’s work together and make sure that you have the knowledge you need to tackle your next project.

In the meantime, if you’re interested in being a Hypothetical Client, please request a demo.

Ashley McConnaughy is the Senior Product Specialist/Training at WealthEngine, specializing in providing in-depth client trainings for both nonprofit and commercial clients. She’s analytical, detail and process oriented and adores tackling projects. While Ashley has many hobbies she shares a passion for comics and has attended the Comic-Con convention to enhance her love of science fiction/fantasy related film, television, and similar popular arts.

 

Nonprofits: Are you Ready to Fail in 2016?

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For every $100 in new donations nonprofits gained in fiscal year 2014 over the previous year, they lost $95 in lapsed or reduced donations.

-AFP 2015 Fundraising Effectiveness Survey

Not many nonprofits think about going into a new calendar year in the framework of failure. However, lack of a clear plan and course of action at the end of 2015 is one of the best ways to ensure failure in the coming months.

Because up to 40% of annual revenue is donated between October and December in any given year, many nonprofit organizations expend tremendous effort and focus on activities within those months.

What happens when January 1 rolls over and all of the gift reconciliation is done?

It’s a mad dash to determine if you have the right course of action in place for Spring Appeals and fundraising efforts.

That’s why we created a new series: 8 Days to a Successful 2016.

We’ll cover the following over 8 days…

Determine Strategy: How does data drive your fundraising today and how should it in 2016? October 30
Submit data for appends: From demographic to wealth to lifestyle appends November 6
Personalize Your Ask: Find the top 10-20 individuals you need to talk to in Nov/Dec November 23
Determine Data Investments: Think about preparing your data for 2016 – spring appeal, major events, etc November 30
Stewardship and Donor Retention Gut Check December 30
Track and measure 2015 results January 11
Wealth screen and append year-end donors and those who were not screened prior to year-end. January 15
Build 2016 models off of 2015 data March 1

(Want to add these dates to your calendar as reminder? We’ll give you the tools to do so when you subscribe to the series below.)

A newly published article in Chronicle of Philanthropy urges nonprofits, “To make fundraising more effective, nonprofits [should] make incremental increases to their fundraising budgets, measure the return on those investments by gain and loss categories, and make additional investments based on those results.”

Becoming a proactive fundraising engine takes more than planning 1 to 2 months in advance.

WealthEngine can help you shift to being a more proactive fundraising organization and assist in your 2016 success, if you are willing to act now.

To get started, subscribe to our 8 Days to a Successful 2016  email series and we’ll take you step-by-step through the process we’ve honed over 15 years working with nonprofits. You’ll get tools, webinars and the option to set up calendar reminders to keep you on track.

How WealthEngine Helps Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Increase Average Gift Size

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When Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) was vetting vendors to help them optimize their fundraising, they were looking for the best value, the highest quality data and an experienced team of subject matter experts. After comparing their options, they decided to move forward with WealthEngine.

With only 2% of their alumni making annual gifts, ERAU needed to understand why they weren’t getting more engagement. They knew that the majority of annual gifts were coming from a small group of people but they did not have many insights. WealthEngine was able to validate this and help ERAU model their best donors and segment their list of alumni.

As a result, ERAU was able to increase their average gift size by 100% and decrease the cost per dollar raised by 50%.

In order to accomplish this, ERAU worked with WealthEngine by starting with a wealth screening and then building on this with a SmartSegment overlay and Likelihood to Give Model. By working with a dedicated WE consultant, the Annual Giving team was able to take the insights provided and turn them into actionable tactics.  Additionally, Embry-Riddle procured access to the FindWealth 8 platform for their extended fundraising team, as well.

Want to find out how WealthEngine can transform your fundraising team’s results, too? Request a demo now.

Attentive.ly Partners With WealthEngine, Here’s Why

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WealthEngine is excited to partner with Attentive.ly to bring wealth intelligence together with social engagement. Hear from Attentive.ly CEO, Rosalyn Lemieux, on why they decided to join forces with us.

How were you first introduced to WealthEngine? 

We were first introduced to WE at the Nonprofit Technology Conference. With data driven fundraising on the rise, they immediately caught our attention with their innovative solutions around data driven marketing in an area (nonprofits) with few players. We were drawn to WE’s forward-thinking, yet incredibly practical, use of social data for modern fundraising, and have come to see WE as a key leader in the fundraising data space, who is also used by many of our customers.

When it comes to your current customers, what does the demand look like for solutions to help personalize communication?…

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